WARRANTS FOR MY ARREST? Tribal police flips tire to help raise awareness to PTSD

After hours of intense interrogation, by Constable Leonard Isaac, of the Tribal Police Stl’Atl’Imx, Mr.Terrance Joseph Kosikar refused to testify and is protected under s. 13 of the Charter from having any incriminating statements “used to incriminate himself in any proceedings against him at this time.

Kosikar says, “It’s not very often you see many people where I live out here in the backcountry, so today was very odd to me when I heard the rumble of a truck creeping its way up the long road to my cabin. I got the binoculars out, and to my surprise, it was a Tribal Police Truck.”

Kosikar admits he immediately ran inside the cabin and put all the guns away..grabbed his camera and started filming this unique situation. Ya see, even when people get shot up here or stabbed, its still very rare for the police to show up. (more…)

The Silence Must Be Broken

This post brings many tears to my eyes …

3 weeks ago while I was in Victoria, I had received an email from a man, thanking the Breaking the Chains BC team for helping save his life during a PTSD Awareness event we had just completed only 2 days prior.

I asked the man to please call me ASAP, and gave him my phone number.
Within minutes, I answered the call from a man named Rand Vance.

He explained that his life had been pretty rough over the years, since a young age (will not get into details in this post) and this was a special day for him because he was handed one of our flyers from one of our very dedicated PTSD WARRIORS.

He looked up our website and learned more about what we we’re doing to help support those who suffer in silence and are living with Post Traumatic Stress. He went through many of our past videos and was very inspired by our message, and felt he was NOT ALONE, and could reach out to us.

So he did.

After hearing Rand Vance story, it had touched my heart so much, that we at Breaking the Chains BC decided that day to do ANOTHER #PTSD / #mentalhealth program for Aug 20th (this past weekend).

Now the second best part of the story, I had opened my facebook the next day to see that Rand had taken it upon himself to start doing the #22pushupchallange and help raise awareness to the 22 soldiers who die by suicide in America each day who suffer with PTSD.

I had watched his video of day one, trying to do his 22 push ups ..and it brought so many tears to my eyes, after hearing his life story and here he was now raising awareness himself to PTSD and dong his best to do so …upon watching him struggle and bang out 14 of his 22 push-ups ..that was the best he could do …it confirmed my personal belief that ..I had now found MY HERO.

I gave him my word on the phone a few days earlier that we would meet in person and we would do another PTSD awareness program on Aug 20th.

Now the best part, Rand Vance shows up 1 hour early on Aug 20th and tells me he doesn’t feel comfortable in crowds and that he’s afraid of being in large groups.

I explained to him as the bus loads of warriors showed up, that WE ARE ALL THERE TO SUPPORT each other and connect together.

Rand, still explained to me that he was not comfortable with so many people around him. I put my paw on his shoulder, looked him in he eyes, and assured him ..he is safe, and in good hands as I looked up to the universe above and smiled.

The video you’re about to watch says it all, as I have no words that will ever describe how it feels to have watched Rand lead over 70 Warriors doing 22 push ups to raise awareness to the 22 soldiers who die by suicide each day in America.

Thank you Rand Vance, you Sir are not only MY HERO, but a huge inspiration to all.

Breaking the Chains BC – with MLA Shane Simpson – Legislature building

Breaking the Chains BC was invited to the Legislature Building in Victoria BC to have lunch with MLA Shane Simpson, the man who tabled Bill M203 the Presumption of Illness.

We had an amazing talk about our petition, prevention, mental health and addiction, support and recovery.

You’re invited to join us in Stanley Park, English Bay to help us raise awareness to PTSD and support those who suffer with Mental Illness.

BEYOND THE CALL – Vancouver Police helping us raise awareness to PTSD

Today, 3 very special Vancouver Police Officers helped us flip our tire a few more KMs to help raise awareness to PTSD, and inform the public of our petition they can help sign that will give all British Columbian First Responders the help they need upon asking for it.

Instead of the years and YEARS of suffering from denial after denial from WCB.

Just last week, 2 more Police Officers ended their lives with their own service revolver.

see petition on home page –

heres your vid

PTSD and Suicide

Not every call ends when the paperwork is filed. PTSD is far more rampant in law enforcement than anyone is really willing to discuss.

PTSD statistics for law enforcement officers are hard to obtain, but range from 4-14%. The discrepancy in this range may be due to underreporting. Living through a traumatic event is hard enough for an officer, admitting that you are having problems related to that event is even harder. There are an estimated 150,000 officers who have symptoms of PTSD. Actually, recent research indicates that 1/3 of active-duty and retired officers suffer from post-traumatic stress; but most don’t even realize it. Law enforcement officers are also at a much higher rate of developing a cumulative form of PTSD related to their exposure to multiple traumatic events. For every police suicide, almost 1,000 officers continue to work while suffering the painful symptoms of PTSD.

Suicide Warning Signs

The officer is talking about suicide or death, and even glorifying death.
Officer is giving direct verbal cues such as “I wish I were dead” and “I am going to end it all.”
Officer is giving less direct verbal cues, such as “What’s the point of living?”, “Soon you won’t have to worry about me,” and “Who cares if I’m dead, anyway?”
The officer is self-isolating from friends and family.
The officer is expressing the belief that life is meaningless or hopeless.
The officer starts giving away cherished possessions.
The officer is exhibiting a sudden and unexplained improvement in mood after being depressed or withdrawn.
The officer is neglecting his/her appearance and hygiene.
The officer is annoyed that they are going to do something that will ruin his/her career, but that they don’t care.
Officer openly discusses that he/she feels out of control.
The officer displays behavior changes that include appearing hostile, blaming, argumentative, and insubordinate or they appear passive, defeated, and hopeless.
The officer develops a morbid interest in suicide or homicide.
The officer indicates that he/she is overwhelmed and cannot find solutions to his/her problems.
The officer asks another officer to keep his/her weapon.
The officer is acting out of character by inappropriately using or displaying his/her weapon unnecessarily.
The officer exhibits reckless behavior by taking unnecessary risks on the job and/or in his/her personal lives. The officer acts like he/she has a death wish.
The officer carries weapons in a reckless, unsafe manner.
The officer exhibits deteriorating job performance.
The officer has recent issues with alcohol and/or drugs.

Act Now

It is important for law enforcement leaders to identify these warning signs to establish a profile of potential at-risk officers and proactively intervene by providing mental health resources and departmental support. If you, as an officer, have noticed one or more of the above behaviors in a colleague, do something now. Ask the officer what is going on in his/her life. Ask if they are okay and how he/she is handling a current stressor. Ask them if they feel depressed, and ask them about suicidal thoughts. Help them get the help they need before they take a life – their own. If they won’t seek help on their own go to a trusted supervisor with your concerns. Yes, this is one situation where you may have to break the code of silence. If something is still not being done, go to someone else: the chaplain, your union representative, the department clinician. You are willing to go to any lengths for an officer who needs assistance on a call; you are willing to risk your life for him at every scene. Do something today to prevent the loss of an officer by his or her own hands.

If you are an officer who is hurting and contemplating suicide, reach out now. There are many people who really do care about you, who really do want to help you, who don’t want to attend your funeral. Seeking help is a sign of strength not of weakness. It is the first step in reestablishing control in your life. Always remember when there is life there is hope.

Respectfully –

Terrance Joseph Kosikar

CTV NEWS / PTSD AWARENESS – Addiction, and Alcohol Recovery – Together We Can

Watch now – todays CTV news coverage live in English Bay, raising awareness to PTSD / Presumption of Illness petition.

click here

Terrance Joseph Kosikar’s heart rate went up, anxiety levels kicked in full throttle, just before speaking to over 40 men, at the Together We Can Drug and Alcohol Recovery and Education Society yesterday morning.
Kosikar says, “He was so nervous and stressed out due to his insecurities of speaking to more than 4 people at one time.
He felt maybe the people that were listening would get up and walk out of the room, as he knows most of his life people laugh at him behind his back and always says he talks to much.
He sat in a small room, lights off, doing a few breathing exercises to bring his heart rate and mind to a slowed pace, before looking up to his higher power for the strength and confidence to get up and try and inspire and motivate over 40 TRUE WARRIORS who were living in a recovery house taking the proper 1st steps to get there life back on track.
As the room filled , one after another , each man took his seat.
Kosikar says, ” the room just kept filling up, one man after the next, as each warrior took his seat.With each one that sat , Kosikar smiled and knew that his 30 years of suffering was all training JUST FOR THIS MOMENT.
This is his destiny. (more…)